Abdominal And Hip Signs In Children

There are many signs of peritoneal irritation.

Rovsing Sign

Palpation of the left lower quadrant elicits pain in the right lower quadrant.

Indication: suspected appendicitis, peritoneal irritation.

Obturator Sign

Passively flex the supine patient’s hip and knee and internally rotate the hip to elicit pain.

Indication: suspected pelvic appendicitis, irritation to obturator muscle.

Psoas Sign

2 options:

  1. Ask the supine patient to flex the hip against resistance to elicit pain.
  2. Ask the supine patient to roll onto their side and passively extend the hip, which stretches the psoas and elicits pain.

Indication: suspected retrocaecal appendicitis, irritation to psoas muscle.

Galeazzi Sign

Have the infant supine, with the hips at 45 degrees and knees at 90 degrees. Look at the height of the knees for asymmetry.

Indication: suspected hip dislocation or congenital femoral shortening.

McBurney’s Point

Pain at the point 1/3 along the line from the ASIS to the umbilicus.

ASIS means anterior superior iliac spine, not a government spy organisation.

That’s the lateral 1/3 point closest to the ASIS.

Indication: suspected appendicitis.

Dunphy’s Sign

When coughing equals pain.

Indication: suspected appendicitis.

References

  1. Gooding, F. (2018). Rovsing’s sign • LITFL • Medical Eponym Library. [online] LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog. Available at: https://lifeinthefastlane.com/eponymictionary/rovsings-sign/ [Accessed 8 Apr. 2018].
  2. MDforAll (2010). Obturator Sign. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jV80jcnhNtA [Accessed 8 Apr. 2018].
  3. MDforAll (2010). Psoas Sign. [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0a0PCwsVQ4 [Accessed 8 Apr. 2018].
  4. Fulford, D. (2018). Galeazzi Test • LITFL • Medical Eponym Library. [online] LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog. Available at: https://lifeinthefastlane.com/eponymictionary/galeazzi-test/ [Accessed 8 Apr. 2018].
  5. Hardin, D. (1999). Acute Appendicitis: Review and Update. [online] American Family Physician. Available at: https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1101/p2027.html [Accessed 8 Apr. 2018].
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